Fed says Minnesota banks almost back to normal after financial crisis

An executive with the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis says profits and the quality of loans held by Minnesota banks are almost back to their historical averages. Those still hurting are mainly Twin Cities area banks that invested in commercial real estate in outer-ring suburbs.
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An executive with the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis says profits and the quality of loans held by Minnesota banks are almost back to their historical averages. Those still hurting are mainly Twin Cities area banks that invested in commercial real estate in outer-ring suburbs.

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