Feds give Minnesota money to more quickly pull contaminated food

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration grants of $600,000 over three years will help the Minnesota Department of Agriculture more quickly remove any contaminated food or recalled products from grocery stores and other distribution points, the Associated Press reports.
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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration grants of $600,000 over three years will help the Minnesota Department of Agriculture more quickly remove any contaminated food or recalled products from grocery stores and other distribution points, the Associated Press reports.

Among the foods recalled in Minnesota recently: cantaloupe, tomatoes, and meat.

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration has awarded the Minnesota Department of Agriculture $600,000 grant to help the department quickly trace contaminated food to grocery stores and other distribution points.

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