Feds to seize Twin Cities home tied to Petters' Ponzi scheme

The U.S. Attorney's Office was given the go-ahead Wednesday by a federal judge to seize a Minnetrista home that was purchased with proceeds from the Tom Petters' Ponzi scheme. The house until recently was occupied by Allen Munson, the ex-husband of former Petters' associate, Deanna Coleman.
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The U.S. Attorney's Office was given the go-ahead Wednesday by a federal judge to seize a Minnetrista home that was purchased with proceeds from the Tom Petters' Ponzi scheme. The house until recently was occupied by Allen Munson, the ex-husband of former Petters' associate, Deanna Coleman.

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