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Millions of dollars later, the Boundary Waters fire is flaming out

The fire has cost over $14 million to combat. As of Sunday, crews had contained nearly three-quarters of the fire. 530 people are still on the scene, fighting the blaze that has already claimed 93,000 acres.
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The fire has cost over $14 million to combat. As of Sunday, crews had contained nearly three-quarters of the fire. 530 people are still on the scene, fighting the blaze that has already claimed 93,000 acres.

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Wildfires continue to burn in Boundary Waters

Officials Saturday were still fighting two small fires by air and ground in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, as well as a 500-acre blaze burning just across the Canadian border. Canadian crews are attacking a "very active" fire known as Fort Frances No. 59, the Duluth News Tribune reports.

Boundary Waters fire spreads to 40 acres

A wild fire in the Boundary Waters has grown to 40 acres while firefighters on the ground work to create a control line. Although rain is not in the forecast for the very dry area, the wind is expected to die down to help crews attack the blaze.

New photos show the aftermath of the Boundary Waters wildfire

The massive wildfire in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness burned about 95,000 acres. Hundreds of firefighters from the Midwest and Rocky Mountains fought the blaze at a cost of more than $20 million. And now, with winter approaching, we're getting a look at the extent of the devastation the fire left behind.

Cost of battling Boundary Waters wildfire tops $12M

Fire officials tell the Associated Press the funding for personnel, supplies, lodging, fuel and equipment comes from the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and the Interior.

Satellite image shows the scar of massive Boundary Waters wildfire

The photo from a NASA satellite shows the 100,000 acres of burned forest in contrast to the green forest surrounding the area. Officials estimate the total cost of the fire, which began mid-August from a lightning strike, is now over $20 million.

Boundary Waters drops lottery system

The Forest Service will start handing out permits on a first-come, first-served basis next year. The Forest Service has quotas at entry points to ensure there are enough campsites.

Weather could once again hinder Boundary Waters wildfire fight

The DNR says temperatures in the 70s are expected in the next few days, which could help fuel the fire. The area has received some rain, but the DNR says hot spots could flare up as vegetation dries.