Fire danger prompts highest warning from Weather Service

A red flag warning is in effect for most of central and southern Minnesota through Tuesday. The combination of dry conditions, low humidity, strong winds, and high temperatures makes wildfires more likely and means they will spread quickly where they do occur.
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The combination of dry, windy, and warm weather has prompted to National Weather Service to issue a red flag warning for much of Minnesota.

Never heard of a red flag warning or not sure what it is? MPR weather blogger Paul Huttner has an explanation.

Not only are conditions ripe for a fire, some are already burning. Monday there were two near Red Lake and one near Lac La Croix in the Boundary Waters. In the Twin Cities area, firefighters from several departments responded to a grassfire in Maplewood.

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Weather Service warns of fire and frost

The National Weather Service says very dry and windy weather will create elevated to critical fire weather conditions across parts of Minnesota. The southern two-thirds of the state is under the most serious wildfire warning. Separately, frost is possible across much of the state Monday night.

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