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First it was your home, now Amazon can leave packages inside your car

Creepy.

Thought it was creepy enough giving an Amazon delivery person access to your house? Now you can do the same for your car.

The retail giant has announced on Tuesday that it's expanding its Amazon Key service so its couriers can leave packages in your vehicle.

Amazon Key's in-home deliveries requires a keypad lock placed on the front door, for which delivery workers have the code so they can drop off packages, with homeowners able to monitor the delivery via remote video.

Now, it's offering Amazon Prime members the option to get their packages delivered to their car while they work, providing another alternative to leaving deliveries on your doorstep.

The service has been launched in 37 U.S. cities including the Twin Cities metro.

Related:

– Amazon teams up with Best Buy to sell Fire TVs.

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How does it work?

You can check if your vehicle is eligible here – basically it needs to be cloud-connected, with owners having remote access to their vehicle from their phone.

Nearly all Chevrolets, Buicks, GMCs, Cadillacs and Volvos with a model year of 2015 or newer are compatible.

You download the Amazon Key app and then link your Amazon account with your connected car service account.

That means when the Amazon delivery person arrives at your vehicle, they're able to use the car's internet connection to unlock and re-lock it.

The app notifies members when the delivery is en route and when it's been delivered.

Amazon staff will be able to find your car provided you park within a 2-block radius of where you set the delivery.

Unlike the home deliveries – which requires the purchase of a $200-plus home security kit – the car-delivery service doesn't cost Prime members any extra (other than the cost of owning a cloud-connected car).

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