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Flood claimed house 100-year-old woman lived in for 62 years - Bring Me The News

Flood claimed house 100-year-old woman lived in for 62 years

Hazel Lafler says she had no flood insurance for her home on Hunter Lake and does not plan to rebuild. She's philosophical about the loss, saying there's nothing she can do about it. "It's like spilling milk; you can't pick it up," she says.
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Hazel Lafler says she had no flood insurance for her home on Hunter Lake and does not plan to rebuild. She's philosophical about the loss, saying there's nothing she can do about it. "It's like spilling milk; you can't pick it up," she says.

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