Flood cleanup continues along Cannon Valley Trail - Bring Me The News

Flood cleanup continues along Cannon Valley Trail

A portion of the trail from Cannon Falls to Welch is back open for hikers, bikers and skaters, but the stretch that leads to Red Wing remains closed. The Republican Eagle reports crews are repairing asphalt, fixing bridges, removing silt and digging debris out of culverts after torrential rains triggered flooding in Cannon Falls last month. Trail manager Scott Roepke says the extremely hot July weather has delayed the cleanup process.
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A portion of the trail from Cannon Falls to Welch is back open for hikers, bikers and skaters, but the stretch that leads to Red Wing remains closed. The Republican Eagle reports crews are repairing asphalt, fixing bridges, removing silt and digging debris out of culverts after torrential rains triggered flooding in Cannon Falls last month. Trail manager Scott Roepke says the extremely hot July weather has delayed the cleanup process.

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