Foes of photo ID measure unleash first TV ad

Our Vote Our Future, a coalition of groups that opposes the proposed photo ID constitutional amendment, has begun running a 30-second TV spot featuring Democrat Joan Growe, who was Minnesota's Secretary of State from 1975 to 1999, the Star Tribune reports.
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Three weeks before Minnesotans vote on whether to require voters to bring a photo identification to the polls, a group opposing the measure has released its first TV ad, the Star Tribune reports. The 30-second spot began running in the Twin Cities this week, a spokeswoman for Our Vote Our Future said.

The ad features Democrat Joan Growe, who was Minnesota's Secretary of State from 1975 to 1999.

Meanwhile Monday, opponents of the measure say it poses real problems for the elderly, MPR reports.

Here's the spot:

The group Protect My Vote, which supports the measure, has an ad of its own:

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