Forest Service change means no more ignoring small blazes - Bring Me The News

Forest Service change means no more ignoring small blazes

The U.S. Forest Service has changed its policy about small fires burning in wilderness areas. The agency has decided it's worth the expense and effort of snuffing out those fires to keep them from growing into blazes like the one that scorched much of the Boundary Waters last year. The new policy will keep firefighters busy for the next couple of months, responding to fires they would have let burn under the old system.
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The U.S. Forest Service has changed its policy about small fires burning in wilderness areas. The agency has decided it's worth the expense and effort of snuffing out those fires to keep them from growing into blazes like the one that scorched much of the Boundary Waters last year. The new policy will keep firefighters busy for the next couple of months, responding to fires they would have let burn under the old system.

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