Former UMD administrator says he lost job when he wanted to fire fitness staffer - Bring Me The News

Former UMD administrator says he lost job when he wanted to fire fitness staffer

A former University of Minnesota Duluth administrator says he was demoted after recommending that the university fire a staffer after sexual harassment complaints. Randy Hyman says then-chancellor Kathryn Martin removed him from his position as vice chancellor after he said UMD fitness instructor Rod Raymond should be fired. Martin was unavailable for comment. Raymond is still employed by the university.
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A former University of Minnesota Duluth administrator says he lost his job after recommending the university fire a fitness staffer after sexual harassment complaints, the Duluth News Tribune reports.

Randy Hyman says then-chancellor Kathryn Martin removed him from his position as vice chancellor after he said UMD fitness instructor Rod Raymond should be fired, the newspaper reports. Raymond was disciplined, but not fired, Hyman said.

Martin, who now lives in Wisconsin, was unavailable for comment. Raymond is still employed by the university. He at one time was also personal trainer to Martin. Hyman believes that Martin was afraid Raymond would sue the university.

Raymond's attorney released a statement that says that a small group of "rogue" employees at UMD took it upon themselves "as self-appointed vigilantes to seek to force Mr. Raymond to quit or cause the University to terminate his employment out of embarrassment, by engaging in a pattern and practice of intimidation and a public smear campaign with the malicious intent of undermining Mr. Raymond’s reputation in the community."

Rod Raymond is also an author and prominent Duluth business owner and endurance athlete, the News Tribune notes. He co-owns Fitger’s Brewhouse, as well as Burrito Union, the Red Star Lounge and Tycoons Alehouse & Eatery.

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