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Furor over amendment language could complicate a special session

Governor Dayton is expected to call legislators back to St. Paul this summer to allocate money for flood-stricken counties. But now it appears a special session might not be that simple. Some Republican lawmakers say they're putting together legislation that would prevent the Secretary of State from making planned changes to the language of Constitutional amendments on the ballot.
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Governor Dayton is expected to call legislators back to St. Paul this summer to allocate money for flood-stricken counties. But now it appears a special session might not be that simple. Some Republican lawmakers say they're putting together legislation that would prevent the Secretary of State from making planned changes to the language of Constitutional amendments on the ballot.

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More questions could be headed to Minnesota's 2012 ballot

The marriage amendment may not be the only proposed Constitutional amendment put to the state's voters this year. Republican lawmakers are considering ballot questions on other issues. Those include needing an ID to vote, needing a supermajority to pass a tax increase, and making union membership voluntary.

Dayton and lawmakers agree to late August special session

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Minnesota Secretary of State Mark Ritchie is changing the title of the constitutional amendment to “Changes to in-person & absentee voting & voter registration; provisional ballots." Sponsors of the measure, seeking to require voters to show a photo ID before casting a ballot, want the question titled "Photo Identification Required for Voting." Ritchie is being sued for changing the title on the marriage amendment question.

GOP lawmakers push amendments to state constitution in 2012

The Republican controlled House and Senate are looking to make nearly a dozen changes this year, but without Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton's approval. Lawmakers can make this happen by passing legislation that puts an amendment on the November ballot. KARE 11 reports the same sex marriage legislation is the only amendment on this year's ballot right now, but others being considered include Voter ID laws, Right to Work issues, abortion restrictions and tax limitations.

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