Future of Duluth's Carter Hotel awaits federal ruling

The Bureau of Indian Affairs is seeking comment on a plan to raze the historic Carter Hotel, the Duluth News Tribune reports. The Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa bought the property in December 2010 and wants to tear it down. The city of Duluth has suggested several ways to reuse the 83-year-old building, but the tribe claims it is "in an extraordinary state of disrepair."
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The Bureau of Indian Affairs is seeking comment on a plan to raze the historic Carter Hotel, the Duluth News Tribune reports. The Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa bought the property in December 2010 and wants to tear it down. The city of Duluth has suggested several ways to reuse the 83-year-old building, but the tribe claims it is "in an extraordinary state of disrepair."

In May, a St. Louis County judge dismissed Duluth's lawsuit against Fond Du Lac band.

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