General Mills hires top-level marketing executive away from MillerCoors

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A top-level marketing executive is leaving MillerCoors to join Golden Valley-based General Mills, Advertising Age reports.

General Mills says Jackie Woodward will serve in the newly-created position of VP-global media, where she will oversee all paid, owned and earned marketing efforts to "drive high-impact media plans."

Woodward had served as VP-marketing connections at MillerCoors since 2008. She joined the company in 2006, after leaving a position with McDonald's.

The move allows Woodward to branch out and oversee global media, since MillerCoors only operates in the U.S., Advertising Age says.

"We're confident this addition to our team will enable us to further advance our global media capabilities and drive rapid adoption of media strategies across our … businesses and key international markets," General Mills Senior VP-Chief Marketing Officer Mark Addicks said in a statement.

According to the publication, General Mills is the 44th largest advertiser in the country and spent $894.2 million in the U.S. in 2013. MillerCoors is the nation's 45th largest advertiser, having spent $839.9 million in the country last year.

General Mills came under fire in April over a story in the New York Times, which said liking the company on social media could render consumers unable to sue General Mills.

The Times article explained that the company had established a new policy, which “broadly asserts that consumers interacting with the company in a variety of ways and venues no longer can sue General Mills, but must instead submit any complaint to ‘informal negotiation’ or arbitration.”

General Mills spokesman Mike Siemienas told the Times that the “online communities” mentioned in the policy referred only to those online communities hosted by General Mills on its own websites.

A few days later, General Mills withdrew the new policy, the Times reported. In a statement on its website, the company said the new terms were “widely misread” and caused consumers to be concerned.

“So we’ve listened – and we’re changing them back to what they were before," part of the statement read.

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