Global disasters may drive up Minnesota insurance rates - Bring Me The News

Global disasters may drive up Minnesota insurance rates

A historic string of natural disasters, such as the tsunami in Japan, has insurers looking carefully at rates to bolster their bottom lines, and ABC 6 News reports that could mean significant increases for homeowners here in Minnesota.
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A historic string of natural disasters, such as the tsunami in Japan, has insurers looking carefully at rates to bolster their bottom lines, and ABC 6 News reports that could mean significant increases for homeowners here in Minnesota.

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