Going negative in November? Some Minnesotans waking up below zero - Bring Me The News

Going negative in November? Some Minnesotans waking up below zero

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This is just lowdown.

We just got rid of negative political ads last week. Now it's the temperature.

Mind you, we're only talking about a slice of western and central Minnesota dipping a toe into the sub-zero realm. But, still, minus signs in mid-November ... ?

Here's how the National Weather Service was seeing the overnight lows shaping up:

BringMeTheNews meteorologist Jerrid Sebesta notes the 7 degrees expected in the Twin Cities gives the metro some insulation from its record for the date of 0.

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At MPR News' Updraft blog, Craig Edwards says an area of western and central Minnesota – from Milan to Little Falls – was the most likely to fall below zero.

But the Weather Service's Duluth office also shows some small numbers in the northeast, with a goose egg in Brainerd.

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There are those who would remind us that cold weather in Minnesota is not exactly news to stop the presses.

Many are having to make adjustments, though, to work around the unseasonable temperatures. The University of Minnesota figured its outdoor stadium would be just right for a college football season that ends at Thanksgiving (not New Year's, like the pros). But this week they've been focusing on removing snow from the stands and preparing for game-day temperatures Saturday that will be well below freezing.

The weather preparations extend to the marching band. One member tells FOX 9 if their horns freeze up, the band will resort to belting out the national anthem with their voices.

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The most high-profile construction project underway in Minnesota also involves a football stadium. The builders of the Vikings new home in Minneapolis tell WCCO they've increased their workforce by 10 percent, partly to build enclosures that help protect employees from the elements.

But the project's general superintendent says it's nothing unexpected. “This is what we do. We’re from here. We live here. We understand it,” Dave Mansell tells the station.

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