Good Samaritan braves flood waters to rescue young deer - Bring Me The News

Good Samaritan braves flood waters to rescue young deer

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An Iowa man braved flood waters to rescue a deer from the Cedar River.

Video posted to Facebook by Karen Schatz of Waterloo, Iowa, shows a good Samaritan – who was wearing a life jacket and being held by others – go into the river to help the young deer.

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KWWL says people were standing on the 4th Street Bridge in Waterloo Saturday looking at the flooding when they saw the deer jump into the river.

The animal swam a few hundred feet, but then it got stranded near the bridge, the news station says. The observers decided to help because they thought the deer – who looked injured – would eventually die if they let it be.

And this wasn't the only deer to get caught in flood waters in northeastern Iowa over the weekend, the Des Moines Register says. Mike Seidel of The Weather Channel tweeted video of a deer swimming in the Cedar River, near Waterloo.

https://twitter.com/mikeseidel/status/779465617422155776

Seidel noted that deer are good swimmers, and it eventually made it to the riverbank.

https://twitter.com/mikeseidel/status/779512327058010112

The headwaters of both the Cedar and Wapsipinicon rivers picked up between 10-15 inches of rain over the past seven days, the National Weather Service said Monday.

The Cedar River hit major flood stage over the weekend, forcing evacuations in the area, according to media reports. And the weather service says rivers in northeastern Iowa could see water levels rise "substantially" over the next week.

For the latest on river levels and potential flooding, click here.

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