Gov. Dayton, former Gov. Arne Carlson appear in new ad

A new ad against the proposed amendment that would require voters to use a government-issued ID at the polls takes a bipartisan approach. Our Vote Our Future began airing the 30-second ad Friday featuring Gov. Mark Dayton, a Democrat, and former Gov. Arne Carlson. a Republican.
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A new ad against the proposed amendment that would require voters to use a government-issued ID at the polls takes a bipartisan approach, MPR News reports.

Our Vote Our Future began airing the 30-second ad Friday featuring Gov. Mark Dayton, a Democrat, and former Gov. Arne Carlson. a Republican.

Although Carlson served as Minnesota governor from '91 to '99 as a Republican, MinnPost says state leaders don't consider Carlson republican anymore because of his endorsements that go against party lines. Carlson publicly supports DFLers Tim Walz and Jim Graves.

In the ad, the governors claim the new requirement would be too costly, keep more seniors from voting and make it harder for active-duty military to vote:

Protect My Vote, supporters of the amendment, will begin running a new ad Saturday, MPR reports. The spot features several people that claim showing an ID is a reasonable way to protect everyone's right to vote and prevent people from cheating the system:

Protect My Vote filed a formal complaint this week against Our Vote Our Future for making the case that military IDs would not be accepted under the new amendment.

A recent Star Tribune poll shows 53 percent of 800 likely voters support the amendment, 41 percent opposed and 6 percent were undecided.

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