Governor complains about legislature's push for constitutional amendments

Governor Mark Dayton says legislators should engage in 'give and take' instead of going around him with constitutional amendments. He says he's most concerned about measures that take away people's rights. The legislature approved a measure to let voters decide on same-sex marriage. Both houses have also approved voter I.D. amendment bills. Some lawmakers are pushing for a amendment to ban mandatory union membership.
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Governor Mark Dayton says legislators should engage in 'give and take' instead of going around him with constitutional amendments. He says he's most concerned about measures that take away people's rights. The legislature approved a measure to let voters decide on same-sex marriage. Both houses have also approved voter I.D. amendment bills. Some lawmakers are pushing for a amendment to ban mandatory union membership.

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