Grab a fishing pole — and a kid — this weekend - Bring Me The News

Grab a fishing pole — and a kid — this weekend

Friday through Sunday is Take a Kid Fishing Weekend in Minnesota, the Department of Natural Resources says. That means you can fish for free without a license if you bring along a child younger than 16.
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Friday through Sunday is Take a Kid Fishing Weekend in Minnesota, the Department of Natural Resources says. That means you can fish for free without a license if you bring along a child younger than 16.

The event is designed in part to stock the state with a new generation of anglers, the Associated Press says.

The DNR event site has great info on where to fish in the state, and the types of fish you'll find in Minnesota.

Here are some cute kids talking about fishing:

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