Ham radio operator sees huge potential in North Dakota home he bought on eBay

A man and his wife picked out their next home, sight unseen, on the Internet auction site because the location could be a prime spot for a ham radio operator. Hams swap "QSL cards" with other operators and compete to find people in obscure locations, and the Fargo Forum writes 57-year-old James Stiles "could become the Babe Ruth baseball card of hams."
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A man and his wife picked out their next home, sight unseen, on the Internet auction site because the location could be a prime spot for a ham radio operator. Hams swap "QSL cards" with other operators and compete to find people in obscure locations, and the Fargo Forum writes 57-year-old James Stiles "could become the Babe Ruth baseball card of hams."

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