'Hate has no business here': MN cafe responds to anti-Muslim rhetoric - Bring Me The News

'Hate has no business here': MN cafe responds to anti-Muslim rhetoric

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A Minneapolis cafe put up a sign saying it stands with Muslim community members, a response to recent comments in the U.S. presidential race.

The Common Roots Cafe shared the sign on social media Thursday.

A Facebook post detailing the decision says after the comments by Republican candidate Donald Trump – in which he called for the U.S. to ban Muslims from coming into the country – the cafe believes it "need[s] to stand up in support of members of our community."

"This is not a place of hate. This is not a place of exclusion or xenophobia. All are welcome here. Except Donald Trump," the post says.

They also use the hashtag #hatehasnobusinesshere.

" target="_blank">In a follow-up tweet, the cafe said it has copies of the sign available for other businesses that want one.

Trump's comments came after the recent attacks in San Bernardino and Paris, which left more than 100 dead and more injured. Those attacks are believed to have been perpetrated by Islamist extremists.

Keith Ellison, who represents Minnesota's Fifth District and is the first Muslim elected to the U.S. House, started a petition asking Trump to "stop the religious fear-mongering," the Star Tribune reported.

On Thursday, the Washington Post wrote about what one U.S. congressman deemed a "rise in Islamophobia" in America since the attacks and Trump's comments. The paper cited the beating of a shop owner in New York by a stranger, a woman accusing someone of being a terrorist and splashing hot coffee in his face, and a severed pig's head placed outside a mosque as recent examples.

A 2014 Pew Research survey found Muslims were among the least-favorably viewed religious groups in the U.S.

Education commissioner offers support

In the wake of "anti-Muslim rhetoric" stemming from recent events, the head of Minnesota's education department is telling schools they have support if that becomes an issue.

The Department of Education Commissioner Brenda Cassellius put out a message Wednesday to superintendents and charter schools.

In it, she says the current environment – in or out of school – might expose children to "disturbing or hateful messages" online or in the real world.

"As school leaders, we must take extra care to work with our teachers and entire school communities to reassure our children, and to address situations that might make them feel unsafe or unwelcome in our schools," she said. "All students—no matter their race, religion, or ethnic origin—deserve to attend school in a safe and caring environment."

BSU responds to anti-Muslim sentiments

At Bemidji State University, administrators are addressing a spike in anti-Muslim sentiment.

The Grand Forks Herald reports BSU President Richard Hanson wrote a letter saying some international students "have been subject to negative statements on and off campus concerning their perceived faith."

Hanson said he "strongly" condemns the verbal attacks, which he called "expressions of bigotry, racism or intolerance."

According to MPR, Provost Martin Tadlock penned a memo to faculty saying Muslim students "are increasingly becoming targets of disparaging comments" from their peers at school, and from others in the community.

He called those comments "unacceptable."

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