Hawaiian monk seals to reside in old dolphin tank at Minnesota Zoo

Author:
Updated:
Original:

Members of an endangered species found in warm water and sandy beaches along the outer Hawaiian Islands are coming to the Minnesota Zoo, the Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal reports.

An announcement in a monthly email to zoo members confirmed that Hawaiian monk seals would be occupying the tanks in Discovery Bay, which housed the zoo's dolphin exhibit that shut down last year.

Zoo director Lee Ehmke said last month that the seal exhibit was a possibility.

The seals can reportedly grow up to 8.5 feet long and weigh 500 pounds.

Work is under way to repair the former dolphin tanks, and construction is expected to go on for much of 2013.

In the meantime, the zoo has installed its "Wall of History" in front of the old exhibit, where patrons can learn about the facility's 35-year history.

The zoo's dolphin exhibit held it last dolphin performances in late August, which was followed by a "Farewell Week" in early September.

Zoo officials said last May that the exhibit was ending "due to the low availability of dolphins and the urgency of other zoo development priorities."

Next Up

Randy Dobnak

Michael Brantley, Astros pound Twins pitching in series finale

Randy Dobnak's six earned runs was part of a long afternoon.

Seimone Augustus

Lynx to retire jerseys of Seimone Augustus, Rebekkah Brunson next season

The former Lynx stars were a key piece of their four WNBA titles.

police tape, crime scene

Rushford police officer fires gun during report of a restraining order violation

The incident occurred on Highway 30 near the Rushford Municipal Airport.

lake water

18-year-old dies from drowning in Quarry Park

The incident is one of several drownings to occur in Minnesota in recent weeks.

Screen Shot 2021-06-13 at 8.28.44 AM

College pitcher from MN gets new prosthetic arm after his was stolen

A tough luck story turned out very positive for the Hawley native.

vaccine, covid

MN saw decline in routine child vaccinations amid pandemic

The CDC study looked at Minnesota and nine other states.

Water

Child hospitalized after drowning in Ham Like

Their current condition is not known.

pontoon

Man dies after falling from pontoon, being swept under boat

Friends believe he struck the motor while under the boat.

Related

Dolphins leaving Minnesota Zoo

Allie and Selmo were originally going to be sent to another facility while their tank at Discovery Bay was being renovated. However, zoo officials said in a letter that "due to the low availability of dolphins and the urgency of other zoo development priorities ... we do not foresee exhibiting dolphins in the building's aquatic environments."

Stingrays may replace dolphins at Minnesota Zoo

Schools of fish and stingrays will likely replace dolphins at the Minnesota Zoo, at least in the short term, MPR reports. The zoo decided this spring it would no longer house dolphins after one died in February, leaving only two in the collection.

Minnesota Zoo puts on last dolphin show

The dolphin show at the Minnesota Zoo is no more. Friday marked the final day for dolphin shows at the zoo after 35 years of performances. Organizers say that the two remaining dolphins -- Allie and Selmo -- will be moving to a new, undetermined location. While the shows are done, the zoo is starting a "Farewell Week" Saturday, where people can stop by to view the dolphins and see them interact with trainers.

Minnesota Zoo plans final farewell for dolphins

Visitors have until Sept. 9 to say goodbye to Atlantic bottlenose dolphins Allie and Semo, the Star Tribune reports. The Apple Valley zoo's Discovery Bay exhibit, which houses the dolphins, is closing for a major $4 million facelift.

Minnesota Zoo mourning death of baby dolphin

Taijah, a playful dolphin who was popular with zoo staff and guests alike, passed away after coming down with a sudden illness.

Zoo CEO: No way to save dolphin exhibit

Minnesota Zoo CEO and Director Lee Ehmke is trying to clarify why the zoo will soon discontinue its dolphins exhibition. There are two main reasons, he said, "the welfare of the two beloved dolphins currently at the zoo, and the fiscal and logistical challenges of acquiring a viable dolphin group to replace them." There are just "no viable" options to keep it going, he said.