Healthy Brains for Children: Would you take a pregnancy test in a bar?

If you make a beeline to the stalls, you might miss the pregnancy test dispenser fastened to a wall in the women’s restroom of Pub 500 in Mankato, Minn. There, with the swipe of a credit card, for a $3 fee, you can use a nearby toilet and learn whether you may proceed in good conscience with the martini you were about to order.
Author:
Publish date:

If you make a beeline to the stalls, you might miss the pregnancy test dispenser fastened to a wall in the women’s restroom of Pub 500 in Mankato, Minn. There, with the swipe of a credit card, for a $3 fee, you can use a nearby toilet and learn whether you may proceed in good conscience with the martini you were about to order.

Next Up

Related

Mankato bar installs pregnancy test dispenser

A tavern in Mankato may be among the first in the nation to put a pregnancy test in a public rest room, KARE 11 reports, and even the pub owner agrees it seems odd. The idea came from a regular customer who is an expert in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. He says, "If it gives you an informed decision at that point in time to stop drinking – your baby is going to be better for it."

MSP Mag: Must. Drink. Brains.

You know, Zombies get thirsty too. The dudes behind Zombie Pub Crawl Ocho know how to hook a boogey up. For the Oct. 13 crawl they have teamed up with local Schell’s Brewery to release cans of ... Brain Belt Cranium.

Engaging teens in pregnancy prevention may be paying off

Experts say a variety of efforts aimed at curbing teen pregnancy rates are paying off, as the birth rate among Minnesota teenagers has plunged nearly 40 percent in the past two decades. Awareness programs that use teens to spark conversations with their peers, as well as increased contraception use, may be part of the reason.

Take caution if you see haze or smell smoke

Pollution officials say they're hearing reports of heavy smoke and ash in parts of northern Minnesota. If you see haze or smell smoke, you should stay indoors and keep activity to a minimum.

U of M tests show high risk for heart attacks in patients who thought they were healthy

Researchers developed the screening tools 10 years ago, and results published recently suggest they're far more accurate than traditional heart screenings. The bad news: The Minnesota Daily says more than a third of the 2,000 people screened so far have been told they're at high risk for heart attacks when they thought they were healthy. The test uses ultrasound to visualize the heart and check for hardening in arteries.