Hennepin County inmates publish poetry collection

After attending three creative writing workshops, a group of 95 Hennepin County Adult Corrections Facility inmates have been introduced to the world of poetry publishing. The sessions resulted in a collection of prose titled "Poems from the Inside."
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After attending three creative writing workshops, a group of 95 Hennepin County Adult Corrections Facility inmates have been introduced to the world of poetry publishing. The sessions resulted in a collection of prose titled "Poems from the Inside."

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