Here are the new policies that have appeared on the White House website

Within moments of becoming President, a new list of policies appear on the White House website.
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Within moments of Donald Trump taking office as the 45th President of the United States, the WhiteHouse.gov website changed.

Former President Barack Obama's White House site is now archived (you can find it here), and the new White House website for the tenure of President Trump has gone live.

It's not very populated at this stage, but there are six policies that have appeared on the "Issues" page that gives some indication of what the new President will prioritize. Here's a brief look at them.

America First Energy Plan

To free America "from dependence on foreign oil," Trump's administration plans to roll back regulations on the energy industry, scrapping the Climate Action Plan and Waters of the U.S. rule, while embracing the "shale oil and gas revolution" by accessing untapped reserves on federal lands.

It also says the administration is "committed to clean coal technology" to revive the coal industry, and goes on to say energy policy must go hand-in-hand with clean air and water and preserving natural reserves and habits as stipulated by the EPA – no mention of climate change, though.

Withdrawal/renegotiation of trade

After promising "Buy American, Hire American" during his speech, Trump's trade policy "starts by withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership" with Australia and several Asian nations, and saying he'll make sure "any new trade deals are in the interests of American workers."

He commits to renegotiating the NAFTA trade agreement with Canada and Mexico, which was signed 25 years ago by George H.W. Bush and eliminates much of the trade tariffs between the two nations. If the countries don't accept America's demands, he'll withdraw from it.

Job creation/tax changes

Trump has a plan to create "25 million new American jobs in the next decade," which will include slashing the corporate tax rates for businesses and pursuing his plans for income tax cuts (which will reduce taxes for all Americans, though analysis has shown the benefit will be to the wealthiest).

He will also propose a moratorium on new federal regulations and order government agencies to identify "job-killing" regulations that could be repealed.

Rebuilding the military

The Trump administration is planning to "rebuild our military" by ending the defense sequester, increasing the size of the U.S. Navy and Air Force.

Investments in a "state-of-the-art missile defense system" to protect the country from attacks from states "like Iran and North Korea" is proposed, as well as beefing up the country's cyber warfare defenses. More help for veterans is also promised.

Foreign policy

Despite an inauguration speech in which he indicated that America would get less involved in foreign affairs, this doesn't extend to defeating ISIS and "other radical Islamic terror groups," which is "our highest priority."

Calling for a foreign policy "based on American interests," Trump says his administration will "embrace diplomacy," adding the country will not go abroad in search of enemies. In a possible wink to Trump's friendly terms with Russian President Vladimir Putin, it says "we are always happy when old enemies become friends."

Supporting law enforcement

Trump is pledging support for the law enforcement community as they battle violent crime, pledging more police on the streets, "more community engagement and more effective policing."

It also contains a passage that seemingly refers to the widespread protests seen over the past few years – some of them prompted by police brutality – with the administration saying: "Our job is not to make life more comfortable for the rioter, the looter, or the violent disrupter."

Oh, and it also mentions supporting border agents by ... yep, building a wall between the U.S. and Mexico.

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