Hot weather blamed for foul smell on area lakes - Bring Me The News

Hot weather blamed for foul smell on area lakes

Unusually warm lake water is producing higher concentrations of blue-green algae this summer. A certified lake manager tells KSTP the scum washes up on shore and the hot sun creates a dead fish smell.
Author:
Publish date:

Unusually warm lake water is producing higher concentrations of blue-green algae this summer. A certified lake manager tells KSTP the scum washes up on shore and the hot sun creates a dead fish smell.

Watch KSTP's story below:

Pam Anderson, with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, also tells Minnesota Public Radio that people should be aware of the toxic dangers of blue-green algae and make sure kids and pets stay out of water that looks doubtful.

Next Up

Related

Lawsuit: MPCA allows pollution of lakes

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency for more than a decade has allowed a sewage treatment plant to pollute recreational lakes in Alexandria, an environmental law firm alleges in a new lawsuit. It's the latest in a string of complaints by advocacy groups who say the state's top environmental regulator is not tough enough in protecting Minnesota's lakes and rivers.

MPCA approves plan to dump taconite in lake to control weeds

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency signed off on a plan to dump more than 13 tons of taconite concentrate into Rush Lake. The lake association wants to reduce the level of phosphorus, which leads to growth of algae and invasive pondweed. It hopes the taconite experiment will do the trick. Audubon Minnesota had argued for an environmental review.

Warm weather could contribute to growth of blue-green algae on Minn. lakes

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency says to keep a lookout for blue-green algae on lakes because it comes with health risks. The toxic algae -- which has a pungent smell, and has a fluorescent green hue or could be pink or blue -- can cause rashes, nausea or vomiting both in humans, and could be potentially be fatal to pets.