If you can't beat it, eat it: Illinois DNR hires chef to cook up some carp - Bring Me The News

If you can't beat it, eat it: Illinois DNR hires chef to cook up some carp

The Illinois DNR has hired a chef to show off just how tasty the invader can be. The state wants to overfish the Asian carp, then give it to food banks, in hopes of keeping it out of Lake Michigan and save native fish that must compete with it. The Asian carp has a voracious appetite and can quickly crowd out native fish.
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The Illinois DNR has hired a chef to show off just how tasty the invader can be. The state wants to overfish the Asian carp, then give it to food banks, in hopes of keeping it out of Lake Michigan and save native fish that must compete with it. The Asian carp has a voracious appetite and can quickly crowd out native fish.

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