Ignition interlock device marks 1-year anniversary - Bring Me The News

Ignition interlock device marks 1-year anniversary

It's the one-year anniversary in Minnesota of the interlock device, designed to dramatically reduce the number of repeat drunken-driving offenders on state roads. Increased DWI patrols are slated for this weekend.
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Minnesota law enforcement agencies are gearing up for a drunk-driving crackdown this weekend, and the effort coincides with the state's one-year anniversary for the DWI interlock device program, which launched July 1, 2011, the Pioneer Press notes.

The law went into effect requiring repeat DWI offenders to install an ignition interlock device on their vehicles in order to maintain driving privileges. The engine won't start if the driver blows into the device and it detects alcohol.

In all, 2,796 eligible DWI offenders have joined the interlock program, the Minnesota Department of Public Safety says in a news release.

DPS says that of those who've taken part in the ignition interlock program, only 2 percent have re-offended, a report by KAAL says. KAAL has video that shows how the device works.

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