In modern climate, rain more likely to come in downpours

Big thunderstorms like the one that flooded Duluth with nine inches of rain last month are becoming more common in Minnesota. Climatologists say the warmer atmosphere holds more water and dumps it in more volatile ways. So gentle, soaking rains across a wide area are getting replaced by localized downpours that leave one area drenched and another dry.
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Big thunderstorms like the one that flooded Duluth with nine inches of rain last month are becoming more common in Minnesota. Climatologists say the warmer atmosphere holds more water and dumps it in more volatile ways. So gentle, soaking rains across a wide area are getting replaced by localized downpours that leave one area drenched and another dry.

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