Inmates' bad acid trip creates chaos, medical emergencies at Faribault prison

Violent reactions to LSD sent two inmates to the hospital by ambulance and four others to the Twin Cities on board a medical helicopter.
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Violent reactions to LSD sent two inmates to the hospital by ambulance and four others to the Twin Cities on board a medical helicopter.

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