Skip to main content
Updated:
Original:

Instagram's new way to straight-up block offensive comments

This is actually different from the current 'inappropriate' comments filter. Here's what's new.

Instagram is just going to block offensive comments now before you ever see them.

Or try to, anyway.

As part of its commitment to "foster kind, inclusive communities" (aka not have a hellhole of a comments section), Instagram is rolling out two new language filters for English users.

The first is just to block "certain offensive comments" on posts and live video. Every other comment will still show up as normal, and ones that get through you can report/delete.

You can turn this filter off by going into your settings, scrolling down to the "Comment" portion.

The second filter specifically targets "obvious spam" comments, and will block those out automatically as well.

How this is different from the current 'inappropriate' filter

Instagram had an option to hide "inappropriate" comments before. It was a feature they rolled out in 2016 and would block replies that contained words from a default "inappropriate" list. You could also add your own words to be blocked.

The new filters announced this week are going to learn.

"Our team has been training our systems for some time to recognize certain types of offensive and spammy comments so you never have to see them," Instagram said in the announcement. "The tools will improve over time, enabling the community’s experience of sharing to improve as well."

The entire thing is done via machine learning, which Instagram calls an "important step" in keeping the app a kind, inclusive place. They say the "toxic" comments make users and businesses not want to post on the app as much.

As the algorithm improves, the new filters could be available in more languages.

WIRED has a story about the Facebook-developed system behind it, called Deep Text.

Facebook – which owns Instagram – this week talked about some of the big challenges with filtering out hate speech.

One of their main conclusions? We are "a long way from being able to rely on machine learning and AI" to understand and assess hate speech.

Next Up

Joleigha Johnson

42-year-old Minnesota woman missing since December 1

She drives a white 2009 Chevrolet Impala.

icy roads, bad roads

20-year-old killed in crash on icy highway during Sunday snowstorm

More than a foot of snow had fallen in the area where the crash occurred.

Mike Zimmer

Vikings fans clamor for change after latest bad loss under Mike Zimmer

The "fire Mike Zimmer" tweets are raging on Twitter again.

Tony Oliva

Tony Oliva and Jim Kaat are finally heading to Cooperstown

The Twins legends were elected to Baseball's Hall of Fame on Sunday night.

Tanner Morgan

Report: Gophers to play in Guaranteed Rate Bowl

The Gophers will reportedly head to Phoenix to take on West Virginia.

Adam Thielen

Winless Lions beat Vikings on final play of game

Adam Thielen also left early with an ankle injury

Payton Willis / Gopher Basketball

Gophers improve to 7-0 on Willis' late 3-pointer

The Gophers earned back-to-back road victories for the first time since January 2017.

Flickr - police lights squad siren - Edward Kimmel

Woman in critical condition after being shot in the head in St. Paul

Officers responded to the incident at around 2:45 a.m. Saturday.

Alexander Mattison

Vikings-Lions: 5 things you can count on

It's a great time for the Vikings to play the Lions.

covid

Omicron variant confirmed in Wisconsin man who traveled to South Africa

Five other cases have been confirmed and linked to a Wisconsin wedding.

Related

Instagram's new way to straight-up block offensive comments

This is actually different from the current 'inappropriate' comments filter. Here's what's new.

Snapchat copycat: Instagram has face filters now too

Instagram just keeps closing the gap with Snapchat.

Snapchat copycat: Instagram has face filters now too

Instagram just keeps closing the gap with Snapchat.

Instagram influencers are still sneaking ads to millions of followers, groups say

What's an ad and what's not? That's often unclear on Instagram, some groups are arguing.

Instagram is getting more Snapchat-y again

Want Instagram to be more like Snapchat? Well, good news.

Instagram will make it easier to see if a post is a paid promotion

Instagram influencers got a warning earlier for not being clear about what they were getting paid to post.