Investigation faults St. Peter hospital for violent offender's botched release

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An investigator has found several factors led to the botched release of a Minnesota Security Hospital patient who was discharged and left at a Minneapolis homeless shelter in July.

The Mankato Free Press reports, that attorney Mary Foarde, concluded that release processes, staff training, staff turnover, and a lack of knowledge about homeless shelters in the Twin Cities were all cited as concerns in the report.

Foarde was asked to review the situation that led to release of 23-year-old Raymond Traylor. He was released from the St. Peter Regional Treatment Center, and left at the Salvation Army's Harbor Light Center in downtown Minneapolis by hospital staff.

Foarde also found that Minnesota needs more resources for the homeless mentally ill who have been treated and no longer meet the criteria for being an inmate in the state hospital. A shortage in facilities that provide lower levels of supervision for the homeless patients routinely holds individuals in the system at a higher level of care than is appropriate.

The Star Tribune reports, that Traylor's case in the latest in a series of management lapses at the hospital. Human Services Commissioner Lucinda Jesson put the hospital on a conditional license status in 2011 and Governor Mark Dayton said the hospital was in crisis after a visit in 2012.

The governor reacted angrily to Traylor's release and Jesson asked for the review of the breakdowns that led to it.

The hospital has put a rigid monitoring system with multiple checkpoints in place, following the breakdown that led to Traylor's release.

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