Investigators link teen to pipe bomb incident at Mayo Clinic

Officials with the Winona County Sheriff's Office tell the Associated Press they are seeking an arrest warrant to take a 17-year-old suspect into custody. Authorities say the teen was at the hospital in Rochester when the pipe bomb was discovered in the trunk of his mother's car last Thursday. It was safely detonated and no was hurt. The teen allegedly made the 3-foot-long pipe bomb in Winona County.
Author:
Publish date:

Officials with the Winona County Sheriff's Office tell the Associated Press they are seeking an arrest warrant to take a 17-year-old suspect into custody. Authorities say the teen was at the hospital in Rochester when the pipe bomb was discovered in the trunk of his mother's car last Thursday. The teen allegedly made the 3-foot-long pipe bomb in Winona County.

It was safely detonated and no was hurt, WCCO reports.

Next Up

Related

Felony charges filed against teen in Mayo Clinic pipe bomb case

A 17-year-old St. Charles boy is charged with possession of an incendiary/explosive device and discharge of a firearm or dangerous weapon endangering public safety, Winona Daily News reports. The teen is accused of making a pipe bomb that was discovered in his mother's trunk last week while he was a patient at the hospital in Rochester. Authorities say the 3-foot-long device weighed about 50 pounds with gunpowder and fireworks.

Mayo Clinic confident it will "redefine health care"

The Post Bulletin reports the Rochester-based clinic plans to spend $3.5 billion on capital investments system-wide over the next five years. Sixty percent of that money will be used for equipment, researchers and technology. The remaining 40 percent will go towards construction projects.

Judge orders Mayo Clinic to reinstate whistleblower

Labor officials say Mayo discriminated against an employee who made legally protected complaints about safety issues. The Post-Bulletin says James Seehusen shared concerns with supervisors about a vehicle's safety as well as the company's failure to conduct regular inspections. Supervisors later suspended Seehusen, a move they say was unrelated to his complaints, but the judge said Mayo failed to prove that.