Is cooling the house heating planet?

In Minnesota and many parts of the country, this summer was one of the hottest in history. The Twin Cities tied a record stretch of 39 days at or above 80 degrees, and air conditioners were running more than usual. Five percent of all the electricity used in the U.S. goes to cool our homes. MPR examines the effect that has on the environment.
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In Minnesota and many parts of the country, this summer was one of the hottest in history. The Twin Cities tied a record stretch of 39 days at or above 80 degrees, and air conditioners were running more than usual. Five percent of all the electricity used in the U.S. goes to cool our homes. MPR examines the effect that has on the environment.

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March heat wave continues to shatter records

It's crazy. But it keeps happening. Insanely warm March weather broke records again this weekend. The Twin Cities had the earliest-ever 80-degree reading. Even the nation's icebox - International Falls - turned in a steamy 77 degrees, breaking the previous record for the date by 22 degrees. Duluth, Fargo, Rochester, St. Cloud, and Winona all set records, as well. Some much needed rain is expected late Sunday through Wednesday, with temperatures cooling down in the 60s for most of the work week.

Cool front breezing through state

A forecast by the National Weather Service calls for highs of 81 degrees on Saturday and 77 on Sunday, which would be lowest in high temperature in more than a month. Overnight lows could dip into the 50s in the Twin Cities. Severe weather is possible in parts of the state Saturday.