Islamic State trial: All 3 MN men guilty of trying to fight for the Islamic State - Bring Me The News

Islamic State trial: All 3 MN men guilty of trying to fight for the Islamic State

They're facing life in prison. Six others charged with similar crimes had pleaded guilty.
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Three Minnesota men were found guilty Friday, June 3, 2016, of planning to fight for the Islamic State overseas.

Abdirahman Daud, Mohamed Farah and Guled Omar were each charged with conspiracy to commit murder outside the United States, conspiracy to join the Islamic State, and attempting to join the Islamic State.

All three were found guilty on those counts, as well as some additional charges, the U.S. Attorney's Office announced.

The U.S. Attorney Andrew Luger said the outcome should "serve as a wake-up call that it will take the entire community to stop terror recruiting in Minnesota."

They're facing life in prison. Six others charged with similar crimes had pleaded guilty.

You can read the original charges against them here, as well as the superseding indictment that brought more serious charges here.

Here's a look at some of what each person was accused of:

Abdirahman Yasin Daud

According to the complaint, Daud had discussions with numerous other suspects in early 2015 about planning to leave the U.S. to join the Islamic State.

In a recorded conversation with a source in the case, he discussed a timeline to get fake passports and said he was "ready." After paying $100, he later provided a photo for the fake passport, and left with another suspect to travel to San Diego in his car.

The charges:

  • Conspiracy to Murder Outside the United States – Guilty
  • Conspiracy to Provide Material Support to a Designated Foreign Terrorist Organization (the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant) – Guilty
  • Attempting to Provide Material Support to a Designated Foreign Terrorist Organization – Guilty
  • Perjury – Not guilty

Mohamed Abdihamid Farah

In May 2014, he was one of the suspects who traveled to New York, by bus, to take a flight to Europe. He planned to then get to Syria to join the Islamic State.

The charges:

  • Conspiracy to Murder Outside the United States – Guilty
  • Conspiracy to Provide Material Support to a Designated Foreign Terrorist Organization (the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant) – Guilty
  • Attempting to Provide Material Support to a Designated Foreign Terrorist Organization – Guilty
  • Perjury – Guilty
  • False statement – Guilty

Guled Ali Omar

The charges say Omar emptied his bank accounts in May of 2014 and planned to travel with two others to California, where they would then make their way separately to Syria. But that November, he tried to fly to San Diego where he would then head to Syria – but was stopped at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport with no luggage and a passport before he could board.

The charges:

  • Conspiracy to Murder Outside the United States – Guilty
  • Conspiracy to Provide Material Support to a Designated Foreign Terrorist Organization (the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant) – Guilty
  • Attempting to Provide Material Support to a Designated Foreign Terrorist Organization – Guilty
  • Attempted financial aid fraud – Guilty

Protesters argue entrapment

The Anti-War Committee has been protesting what it calls entrapment by the FBI in these cases, arguing investigators have “manufactured” terror cases for these suspects – essentially encouraging the suspects to plan to travel overseas with the use of an informant, providing them with resources, and then arresting them.

“In reality, there would be no case if not for the FBI informant who was paid $41,000 to entrap these young men by encouraging them to travel abroad and making arrangements such as buying passports,” Sophia Hansen-Day of the Anti-War Committee said in an email news release.

They plan to speak outside the courtroom afterward.

Author Peter Bergen talks about law enforcement’s strategy in his recent book, “The United States of Jihad,” which looks at what ties together (or doesn’t tie together) different cases of foreign fighters in recent years.

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