Kiffmeyer vows to continue fight for photo ID

State Rep. Mary Kiffmeyer, the chief advocate of the photo ID constitutional amendment that was defeated by voters, says the issue is far from dead. The Big Lake Republican and former Minnesota secretary of state intends to press for it in the Legislature. She was elected to the state Senate on Tuesday. Kiffmeyer says the measure was defeated because of "misinformation" spread by critics.
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Rep. Mary Kiffmeyer, the chief advocate of the photo ID constitutional amendment that was defeated by voters, says the issue is far from dead. The Big Lake Republican and former Minnesota secretary of state intends to press for it in the Legislature, the Star Tribune reports. She was elected to the state Senate on Tuesday.

Kiffmeyer also says she plans to pursue the issue with Gov. Mark Dayton, the newspaper reports.

Kiffmeyer says the measure was defeated because of "misinformation" spread by critics, MPR reports. "I think it was a combination of a lot of money, and targeting and just plain plugging away at saying the same inaccurate statements again and again in regards to cost," Kiffmeyer told MPR for a story that examines how the voter ID amendment failed.

The measure was widely expected to pass, and polls during the campaign season showed it had the majority support it needed, until a KSTP/SurveyUSA poll just before the election showed the vote evenly split.

Kiffmeyer sponsored the amendment in the House, and helped lead the campaign to get it passed. She clashed with critics in a number of debates before the vote.

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