Lawsuit filed against DNR to stop Minn. wolf hunt

Two groups have filed a lawsuit against the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to try to stop a wolf hunting season on Nov. 3. The Center for Biological Diversity in Tucson and locally based Howling for Wolves claims the DNR did not allow the opportunity for public input on the bill.
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A lawsuit has been filed against the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to stop the state's wolf hunting and trapping seasons beginning on Nov. 3, the Associated Press reports. The Center for Biological Diversity in Tucson and locally based Howling for Wolves claims the DNR did not allow the opportunity for public input on the bill.

The Star Tribune says the DNR did not comment on the lawsuit but conducted an online survey asking the public to respond on the plan. The survey received 7,351 responses, with 1,542 supporting a wolf hunt and 5,809 against it.

The DNR tells MPR News that the survey was intended to elicit comments on how the season would work, not a referendum on whether to hold the season.

Over 23,000 people applied for wolf hunting licenses, but only 6,000 will be issued.

A copy of the lawsuit can be found here.

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