Legislators hoping to tackle tax relief

When legislators return to the Capitol Monday, they'll have one thing on their minds: tax relief. House Republicans are looking to cut business taxes while Senate Republicans are hoping to get rid of the so-called "marriage penalty." Governor Dayton says he likes cutting taxes as much as anyone, but, isn't clear on where the money will come from.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

When legislators return to the Capitol Monday, they'll have one thing on their minds: tax relief. House Republicans are looking to cut business taxes while Senate Republicans are hoping to get rid of the so-called "marriage penalty." Governor Dayton says he likes cutting taxes as much as anyone, but, isn't clear on where the money will come from.

Next Up

Related

Reconciling House, Senate tax bills could be a taxing endeavor

They both want to phase out business property taxes but they don't agree on how ... or on much else. A roomful of Republicans will try to find common ground on how to change Minnesota tax policy as a legislative conference committee tackles House and Senate bills that are farther apart than you might expect.

Lawmakers and governor meeting on flood relief this week

A legislative panel on flood relief holds a Capitol hearing Thursday, to be followed on Friday by meetings with Gov. Mark Dayton. Dayton hopes to call a one-day special legislative session on August 24th to allocate money to counties struck by flooding this summer. Some Republicans have balked at the governor's proposed $190 million relief package.

No deal from Dayton, lawmakers on flood relief

Agreement on disaster relief for flood-stricken Minnesota counties is proving elusive for Gov. Mark Dayton and Republican legislative leaders. Talks are continuing. It's unclear if the goal of convening a special legislative session on Friday can be met.

Dayton tells counties no financial relief on horizon

The governor says he's sympathetic to the financial plight of Minnesota's counties, but they should not expect any help from the state's newly discovered budget surplus. Those funds will go to state reserves and maybe to schools but will not restore cuts in aid to counties. That'll keep more upward pressure on property taxes.

GOP lawmakers looking to slash business property taxes

The proposal would cut taxes by about 30 percent over the next six to 12 years. The House Taxes Committee Chairman Greg Davids told the Pioneer Press it would be the "bigger job creator." DFL Gov. Mark Dayton hasn't ruled out the Republican plan, but doesn't know how they plan to pay for the tax cut.