Lightning strikes knock cross off Mpls. church, spark fire in rural home

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The storms that passed through Minnesota overnight left some damage behind, with lightning strikes causing a house fire and damage to a historic church.

The impact of the thunderstorms was particularly noticeable in south Minneapolis, where FOX 9 reports the cross atop St. Helena's Catholic Church was struck by lightning, causing it to crash to the ground.

The TV station notes that the limestone cross, which had been on the church for 75 years, was struck and fell at around 4 a.m., damaging the marble steps at the entrance to the church at 3204 E. 43rd St.

Nobody was hurt, though the impact of the falling rubble could be heard as far as two blocks away.

There was more damage caused in Loretto, Minnesota, when lightning sparked a two-alarm house fire on the 100 block of Summit Avenue.

KARE 11 reports the blaze was called in at around 3 a.m., and while the flames mostly affected the roof of the home, smoke and water damage is expected to take a big toll on the property.

Again, nobody was injured and area fire departments were able to knock it down quickly.

Flooding in Wisconsin, weather warmup predicted for MN

While Minnesota had its fill of stormy weather overnight, Wisconsin is bearing the brunt Wednesday afternoon with the National Weather Service warning that some flooding is possible.

Some roads in Dunn County, west of Eau Claire, have been closed following flash flooding, with rains of 2 to 3 inches falling throughout the area.

Minnesota is expected to warm up now in the forthcoming days, with Accuweather predicting "warm and humid" weather with temperatures potentially hitting as high as 90 towards the end of the week.

The heat will begin to back off over Labor Day weekend however, with more storms possible on Saturday and Sunday, before cooler temperatures (in the 70s) return next week.

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