Lindstrom, Minnesota, a case study in Americans' relationship with the safety net - Bring Me The News

Lindstrom, Minnesota, a case study in Americans' relationship with the safety net

The New York Times went to Lindstrom to explore the sometimes contradictory feelings many Americans have about the country's safety net of government programs. The paper found that even some Minnesotans who say they want less government find themselves increasingly reliant on programs like Medicare and free school lunches.
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The New York Times went to Lindstrom to explore the sometimes contradictory feelings many Americans have about the country's safety net of government programs. The paper found that even some Minnesotans who say they want less government find themselves increasingly reliant on programs like Medicare and free school lunches.

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