Farmers say ethanol is eating up too much corn, could cause spikes in meat prices

Livestock farmers are demanding changes to the nation's ethanol policies. They say the fuel is taking up too much of the corn and that a grain shortage could cause meat prices to spike. Food producers also worry federal policies would exempt the ethanol industry from rationing during a shortage.
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Livestock farmers are demanding changes to the nation's ethanol policies. They say the fuel is taking up too much of the corn and that a grain shortage could cause meat prices to spike. Food producers also worry federal policies would exempt the ethanol industry from rationing during a shortage.

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