Longtime news stand in the Mayo Clinic Gonda building near its end

After more than 5.5 decades the Kaplan family's Subway News Stand in downtown Rochester will ring up its last sale on Aug. 31, the Post Bulletin reports. Declining sales, changes in the industry and rising prices convinced 84-year-old Ben Kaplan and his nephew it was time to close up shop. There's no word yet what Mayo Clinic has planned for the space.
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After more than 5.5 decades the Kaplan family's Subway News Stand in downtown Rochester will ring up its last sale on Aug. 31, the Post Bulletin reports. Declining sales, changes in the industry and rising prices convinced 84-year-old Ben Kaplan and his nephew it was time to close up shop. There's no word yet what Mayo Clinic has planned for the space.

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