Luxury apartments in demand in Twin Cities

Looking to rent a place in the urban center, with all the amenities, close to shopping, gyms and a good coffee shop? Get in line. Developers are scrambling to meet demand for high-end apartment complexes in the Twin Cities. In the fourth quarter of 2011, Minneapolis issued permits to build 1,900 residential units in downtown alone, KARE 11 says.
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Looking to rent a place in the urban center, with all the amenities, close to shopping, gyms and a good coffee shop? Get in line. Developers are scrambling to meet demand for high-end apartment complexes in the Twin Cities. In the fourth quarter of 2011, Minneapolis issued permits to build 1,900 residential units in downtown alone, KARE 11 says.

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