Mankato bar installs pregnancy test dispenser

A tavern in Mankato may be among the first in the nation to put a pregnancy test in a public rest room, KARE 11 reports, and even the pub owner agrees it seems odd. The idea came from a regular customer who is an expert in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. He says, "If it gives you an informed decision at that point in time to stop drinking – your baby is going to be better for it."
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A Mankato bar has put a pregnancy test dispenser in the women's room – perhaps a first, KARE 11 reports.

A customer who is also an expert in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder suggested it, KARE 11 reports. He believes placing the pregnancy tests in upscale bars targets the demographic most likely to drink while pregnant - financially stable women, in urban areas, over age 30.

A new CDC report says one in 13 women drink during pregnancy, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Here's the report from KARE:

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