Marriage amendment activists on both sides duel over children of gay couples

Internet celebrity Zach Wahls, the 21-year-old son of an Iowa same-sex couple, has been campaigning in Minnesota this week against the state ballot measure that would effectively ban gay marriage. Meanwhile, the pro-measure group Minnesota for Marriage has released a video that argues children of same-sex couples are more vulnerable than those raised by a mother and father.
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In the final weeks before Minnesotans vote on whether to approve an state constitutional amendment that bans gay marriage, the debate is heating up over the kids of same-sex couples, MPR reports.

Last month, the Minnesota chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, representing 900 doctors, joined the fight against the amendement, arguing that it would be harmful to children and families.

Zach Wahls agrees. The 21-year-old Iowa man who was raised by two mothers is traveling in Minnesota with Minnesotans United for All Families to speak against the amendment. Wahls, scheduled to speak at the Democratic National Convention on Thursday, became an Internet sensation when a speech he gave to the Iowa Legislature was viewed more than 17 million times on YouTube:

On the other side of the debate, the pro-amendment group Minnesota for Marriage has released a video featuring former KSTP anchor Kalley Yanta, who argues children do better when raised by a mother and father (watch below).

Yanta cites two studies, one at the University of Texas and one from a Louisiana State University researcher. The reports contradict oft-cited exhaustive research by the American Psychological Association that "there is no scientific evidence that parenting effectiveness is related to parental sexual orientation."

(At least one critic says both studies mentioned by Yanta are coordinated anti-gay rights political propaganda.)

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