Mary Franson among sponsors of bill preventing employers requiring Facebook passwords

Alexandria Republican Mary Franson is among the sponsors of a state bill keeping employers from requiring applicants to hand over Facebook passwords. The bill is in response to reports that people seeking jobs had to give company officials their social media passwords as a condition of employment.
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Alexandria Republican Mary Franson is among the sponsors of a state bill keeping employers from requiring applicants to hand over Facebook passwords. The bill is in response to reports that people seeking jobs had to give company officials their social media passwords as a condition of employment.

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