Mayo Clinic expert supports NYC's large-soda ban

An obesity expert at Mayo Clinic has gotten behind New York City's controversial new ban on sugary beverages in containers bigger than 16 ounces, the Rochester Post-Bulletin reports. “Understandably, people don’t like being told what to eat, but a limit like that isn’t unreasonable,” Dr. Donald Hensrud, a Mayo endocrinologist, says.
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New York City residents had lots to say on both sides of a controversial new city ban on sugary drinks bigger than 16 ounces, which the city's health board approved this week.

Mayor Mike Bloomberg and other advocates say its a huge first step in attacking obesity. And it could have other positive health effects. One recent NIH study suggests too much soda increases risk of strokes. But critics say they ought to have the freedom to buy a big soda.

Now one prominent Mayo Clinic expert has jumped into the debate, in favor of the ban, the Rochester Post-Bulletin reports. “Regular soda is a triple whammy, so to speak. It’s extra calories, there’s no nutritional value at all, and it may displace other foods that are healthier," Dr. Donald Hensrud, a Mayo endocrinologist and obesity expert, says.

Here's Bloomberg on CNN talking about the ban:

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