Mayo Clinic wins major patent victory

The Supreme Court sided unanimously with Mayo in a patent dispute with California-based Prometheus Laboratories. The clinic had used a blood test developed by Prometheus until 2004, when it developed its own in-house test. Prometheus sued for patent infringement, but Mayo argued that using test to measure a natural bodily process is not patent eligible.
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The Supreme Court sided unanimously with Mayo in a patent dispute with California-based Prometheus Laboratories. The clinic had used a blood test developed by Prometheus until 2004, when it developed its own in-house test. Prometheus sued for patent infringement, but Mayo argued that using test to measure a natural bodily process is not patent eligible.

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