Mayo doctor warns desk dwellers: Sitting is 'the new smoking'

A Mayo Clinic researcher says a third of Minnesotans are either already diabetic or on their way, and the culprit, according to Dr. James Levine, could be sitting. He's teaming up with other researchers at Mayo and the University of Minnesota to study how even a little activity, even standing, can improve health.
Author:
Publish date:

A Mayo Clinic researcher says a third of Minnesotans are either already diabetic or on their way, and the culprit, according to Dr. James Levine, could be sitting. He's teaming up with other researchers at Mayo and the University of Minnesota to study how even a little activity, even standing, can improve health.

Next Up

Related

Mayo researchers attribute drop in heart attacks to smoke-free workplaces

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic say heart attacks in Olmsted County dropped by one-third after Minnesota adopted a law banning smoking in all workplaces, including bars and restaurants. The leader of Mayo's study tells Reuters other risk factors -- cholesterol, blood pressure, obesity -- stayed the same, leaving the reduction in second hand smoke as the apparent explanation for the decline.

Mayo finds rapid rise in skin cancer among young adults

The deadly skin cancer melanoma is turning up in eight times as many young women and four times as many men compared with 40 years ago, according to a new study from Mayo Clinic. The study didn't suggest a cause, but researchers were quick to point to tanning beds.

Mayo joins with community groups to help immigrants avoid common diseases

Immigrants and refugees often arrive in good health, but within a generation many of them are suffering from obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and other common problems. In what MPR calls a "first-of-its-kind collaboration," Mayo Clinic is partnering with community organizations to teach new arrivals to Minnesota about the importance of diet and exercise.